Michigan Alliance FC

Just for Fun!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sport We Love - Part 1

 

 

 

 

Sport We Love - Part 2

 

 

 

Old joke but still funny: Cristiano Ronaldo vs Lionel Messi

 

Before a Real Madrid and Barcelona game, Ronaldo declared "I have been sent by the Gods of Football to teach the world how to play football!". 

Later, at the post-game press conference after Barcelona had won, Messi was asked "How do you feel that Ronaldo said that he'd been sent by the Gods of Football to teach the world how to play football"?

 

Messi replied "That's funny.... I don't remember sending him!"

 

 

 

Nominations for US Youth Soccer 2012 Goal of the Year

 

 

Nominations for US Youth Soccer 2012 Save of the Year

 

 

 

Why do we call it Soccer?

 

The proper name of the sport we call soccer is Association football (both words are part of the game's name; simply "football" is insufficient, though common). It refers to the game that is played using the IFAB's Laws of the Game, such as in the FIFA World Cup. The name is a reference to the English Football Association, which was (originally, and quite literally) an association of schools that agreed to use the same set of rules. Before the rules were codified into the first widely-accepted edition of the Laws of the Game in 1863, each school had its own version of the rules.

The term "soccer" was coined in 1871 upon the foundation of the Rugby Football Union, an offshoot rule set originating from a disagreement during the codification of the London Rules (now known as the Laws of the Game), in order to differentiate the different versions of football. The word itself was derived from the third through the fifth letters of "Association" ("soc") and used in a diminutive manner, much like those who call it "Football" might shorten the name to "footy".

In the United States, Ireland, Australia, and most of Canada and South Africa (and formerly, New Zealand), for instance, the more popular local football games are called "football". In such places, the term "soccer" is used in reference to Association football and to differentiate between Rugby, Gridiron Football (United States and Canada), Gaelic Football (Ireland) and Australian Rules Football (Australia).

It is interesting to note, as mentioned above, that the term "soccer" was invented in England by the people who codified it - the same people that now chide Americans for using that term! Conversely, some Americans who prefer the British term football jokingly refer to Gridiron football as "throw-ball", much to the delight of our neighbors from across the pond.


So you think you can juggle?

 

 

 

 

Fans trying to help Home Team Score Goal!